Kazakhstan aims to increase cargo transportation to Turkey by sea

Kazakhstan aims to increase cargo transportation to Turkey by sea

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Kazakhstan intends to increase the volumes of cargo transportation to Turkey via sea routes by three times.

This was announced by Kazakh Minister of Investment and Development Zhenis Kasymbek at a plenary session of the lower chamber of the Kazakh Parliament on February 7.

Kazakhstan’s Majilis approved the bill of ratification of the Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime Navigation, Kazinform reported.

“The Protocol enlarges the list of the acts classified as terrorist and defines the response mechanisms and mutual help in the event of assault on ships. Today 40 states have joined the Protocol, and almost all Baltic and Black Sea countries,” Kasymbek said.

Currently, Kazakh trade ships are actively developing marine routes to open sea ports, he noted.

“Up to 35,000 tons of general cargo were shipped in 2017 from the port of Aktau to the ports of Turkey. In 2018 the volume of shipment will be increased three times,” the official said.

Also it is planned to start shipping oversize equipment from the Black and Baltic ports to Kazakhstan for construction of the plant of Tengizchevroil company, he said.

The agreement between Kazakhstan and Russia reached within the Eurasian Economic Union to introduce simplified transit of Kazakhstan ships via Russian water ways has also fostered the growth of traffic volume, according to the minister.

The ratification of the Protocol contributes to the strengthening of legal guarantees for ensuring security of Kazakh ships floating in the high seas, he stressed.

Commenting on the questions of MPs, Kasymbek noted that the provisions of the Protocol fully comply with the legislation of Kazakhstan, including – regarding the possibility of using the vessel as a weapon of crime.

Therefore, after the ratification of the Protocol, there will be no need to amend the current legislation.

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